Athenaeum Library Book Arts Lecture

Art History Lectures

Impressionism

Presented by Linda Blair

 

POSTPONED—TBA 2020

All lectures begin at 7:30 PM

 

Impressionism was transformative. It shattered the trajectory of Western art that had been born in the 1400s Florence. For the following 400 years art remained true to its Renaissance beginnings and hummed along quietly, but by the 1860s, it began to slip off its smoothly greased rails. A new generation of skilled, innovative artists—today revered, but reviled in their own day—despaired over the morbidity of that long tradition. They met on Thursday nights at Café Guerbois to question the basic assumptions upon which art had rested for so long. We will explore why these young avant-garde artists were willing to sacrifice so much material comfort and professional approbation in order to create a new art. 

  

The lecture series will place the Impressionist movement within its historic context, as well as examine its philosophical underpinnings, and radical innovations as developed by its leading artists: —Edouard Manet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Edgar Degas, —before turning to the artist who most fully inhabits the theories and techniques of Impressionism, Claude Monet.

 

TBA » Historic Context, Influences, and Practices

 

The first lecture is devoted to the basic premises and practices of Impressionism. Other contributory factors, such as the role of photography, studies in optics, the influence of the Barbizon painters, and an emerging sense of individualism, will be discussed. The rest of the first lecture and the second one will be devoted to Edouard Manet, called the Father of Impressionism when in fact he was not an Impressionist at all, but an extraordinarily inventive, indeed, almost revolutionary artist.


TBA » Edouard Manet: Father of Impressionism

 

The lecture series continues with Edouard Manet’s formative years. His daring work attracted other rebellious painters to his leadership. One of Manet’s many tragedies was that he was unable to explain or justify his work and this made him vulnerable to ridicule and exclusion by the very establishment he so wished to join. 


TBA » The Paris of Renoir and Degas

 

This lecture contrasts the work of Renoir and Degas, two painters so antithetical in personality, technique, and subject matter that each throws the other into high relief. Both provide keen insight into 19th century Paris, its high and low pleasures, from its well-inhabited bordellos to the privileged lives of the haute bourgeoisie. If time permits, we will begin to explore the early paintings and development of Claude Monet, one of the most influential artists of recent centuries. 


TBA » Claude Monet: Formative Influences and Early Works

 

This lecture is devoted to Monet's early works, as the continuation and ultimate rejection of Impressionist theory, when Monet's art continues to evolve. Included will be his famed series works—the haystacks and façade of Rouen cathedral, studies of the effects of light on form and color. (Note: March 27 is a Friday.)


TBA » Claude Monet: The Late Years

 

The magic of Monet’s paintings continues, with special emphasis placed on his late works, the water lilies series and studies of his beloved pond at Giverny, when air, water, and form evaporate into the ephemeral and art soars into abstraction.  

 

About Linda Blair: 

Linda Blair has taught art history for many years, at the La Jolla Athenaeum and UC San Diego Osher; she was a docent at The Cloisters. She holds a B.A. from Mills College, and an M.A. from USD. She is an active volunteer at UC San Diego, dedicated to raising scholarship funds.  

 

Joan & Irwin Jacobs Music Room

Athenaeum Music & Arts Library

1008 Wall Street

La Jolla, CA 92037

Click here for directions

 

Individual tickets: $14 member / $19 nonmember

Series tickets: $60 member / $85 nonmember

 

 

 

Online tickets are subject to ticketing fees.

 


Athenaeum Library Book Arts Lecture

Art History Lectures

Raphael

A Five-Part Art History Lecture Series Commemorating the 500th Anniversary of the Artist’s Death

Presented by Victoria Martino

 

POSTPONED—TBA 2020

All lectures begin at 7:30 PM

 

In Memoriam Konrad Oberhuber (1935–2007), in Tribute to the 85th Anniversary of His Birth (March 31, 2020)

 

Join art historian Victoria Martino for an in-depth look at the life, work, and legacy of the great Renaissance master whose far-reaching influence on art and aesthetics still makes itself felt 500 years after his death. The consummate example of a “Renaissance man,” Raphael excelled in all artistic disciplines: exquisitely executed drawings, paintings, frescoes, mosaics, tapestry cartoons, preparatory drawings for engravings, and architectural designs. Beloved, admired, and emulated by all who knew him, he exemplified the essential virtues of the courtier, rising higher in the social hierarchy than any other artist of his time.

 

TBA » The Early Years (1483–1504)

 

Son of Giovanni Santi, court painter to the Duke of Urbino, Raphael was trained from an early age as a painter and courtier. Orphaned at age 11, the precocious young artist took over the management of his father’s workshop. He was apprenticed to the Umbrian master Pietro Perugino, absorbing his teacher’s style so thoroughly that art historians still have difficulty distinguishing between their hands. Raphael’s prolific output during his years in Umbria indicates that he was already very much in demand as a painter throughout the region.


TBA » Florence (1504–1508)

 

The young “master” broadened his artistic horizons by moving to Florence, cultural center of the Italian Renaissance. There he studied the works of Leonardo and Michelangelo, avidly assimilating aspects of their styles without losing his own developing style. In Florence, Raphael also began to immerse himself in the study of classical antiquity, incorporating elements from sarcophagi in his drawings and paintings. At the suggestion of the papal architect Donato Bramante, who was distantly related to Raphael, the new Pope Julius II invited the young artist to Rome, where he spent the rest of his life.


TBA » Rome (1508–1520)

 

In Rome, Raphael was immediately commissioned by Pope Julius II to decorate his private library in the Vatican Palace with frescoes. These works met with such acclaim that Raphael was asked to paint frescoes in three succeeding rooms of the Pope’s private quarters. Further papal commissions included tapestry designs (cartoons) for the Sistine Chapel, and decorative frescoes for the loggie of the Vatican Palace. Raphael quickly became the most sought-after artist in Rome, painting portraits, altarpieces, and religious paintings, decorating villas, and designing chapels and churches.


TBA » Workshop and Collaborations

 

Raphael received more commissions in Rome than he could possibly execute. Consequently, he built up a large studio of assistants, which grew to include fifty artists, some of whom later became famous in their own right. The universal demand for designs by Raphael led him to create preparatory drawings for engravings, which were executed by a master printer, Marcantonio Raimondi. Appointed architect for St. Peter’s Basilica after Bramante’s death, Raphael also designed and decorated villas for the patrician class.


TBA » Critical Reception through the Centuries

 

At the time of his premature death at age 37, Raphael was the most beloved and renowned artist of his time. Thousands attended his grand funeral, and he was buried in great pomp in the Pantheon. Over the course of the centuries, he became the most important artist to imitate or rebel against. He was the hero of Renaissance humanism and classicism, and the antihero of Mannerism and the Baroque. In the 19th century, Raphael was the model for the German Nazarene movement and the nemesis of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in England.

 

About Victoria Martino: 

Art historian Victoria Martino is a magna cum laude graduate of Harvard University and the University of California. She studied art history at Harvard with two pre-eminent Renaissance scholars of the 20th century: Sydney Freedberg and Konrad Oberhuber. She has taught art history and interdisciplinary arts courses at universities in the United States and Australia, and she has curated over two dozen major museum exhibitions in Europe and the United States. With more than 60 academic and museum publications in six different languages to her credit, she is highly regarded for her thorough and impeccable scholarship.

 

Joan & Irwin Jacobs Music Room

Athenaeum Music & Arts Library

1008 Wall Street

La Jolla, CA 92037

Click here for directions

 

Individual tickets: $14 member / $19 nonmember

Series tickets: $60 member / $85 nonmember

 

 

 

Online tickets are subject to ticketing fees.

 


Athenaeum Library Book Arts Lecture

Art History Lectures

Leading Bad Boys and Girls of British Art

British Art before, during, and after Bacon and Freud

Presented by Derrick Cartwright and Hugh Davies

 

POSTPONED—TBA 2020

All lectures begin at 7:30 PM

 

Join us for a three-part lecture series on British Art that will be jointly presented by Hugh Davies and Derrick Cartwright.

 

This series looks at a broad swath of British art from the late Victorian era up to the present day. The focus of these talks, however, will be the distinct legacies of Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud. Friends, and later rivals, Bacon and Freud drew selectively on the prior achievements of British painters and sculptors, from Walter Sickert and Wyndham Lewis to Barbara Hepworth and Jacob Epstein. Largely defying the critical expectations of their period, these artists produced shocking representations and lived unconventional lives, sometimes drawing as much attention to themselves for their outrageous behavior as for their work. In this way, they proved to be durable models for the current generation of artists throughout the UK.

 

TBA » Walter Sickert, Gwen John, and Stanley Spencer

 

TBA » Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud

 

TBA » Damien Hirst and Tracey Emin

 

 

About the lecturers:

Derrick Cartwright, PhD, is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of San Diego, where he is also Director of University Galleries, and serves as Director of Curatorial Affairs for the Timken Museum of Art in Balboa Park. Cartwright is currently a member of the Advisory Board for Murals of La Jolla. He teaches a wide range of courses at USD, from surveys of modern North and South American art to seminars on the history and theory of collecting.

 

Hugh M. Davies, PhD, is recognized in­ternationally as a scholar in the field of contemporary and modern art. Davies served from 1983 to 2016 as director of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and was named Director Emeritus by the museum’s trustees in 2016. Davies is currently a member of the Francis Bacon Authentication Committee, which published the artist’s catalogue raisonné in 2016. His doctoral dissertation on Francis Bacon was published by Garland Press, and he has subsequently published extensively on Bacon’s work.

 

Joan & Irwin Jacobs Music Room

Athenaeum Music & Arts Library

1008 Wall Street

La Jolla, CA 92037

Click here for directions

 

Individual tickets: $14 member / $19 nonmember

Series tickets: $36 member / $51 nonmember

 

 

 

Online tickets are subject to ticketing fees.